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Chicago taxpayers can't afford the Obama Center

Forums The Voting Booth Chicago taxpayers can't afford the Obama Center

This topic contains 21 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  finance85 1 year, 1 month ago.

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  • #191616

    F4Gary
    Participant

    Letter: Chicago taxpayers can’t afford the Obama center

    Chicagoans are proud that we sent President Barack Obama to Washington. We are proud to have his (not) library located in the city that launched him. It is incomprehensible that President Obama, who ran as a man of the people on a promise of “change we can believe in,” is now comfortable with hitting the taxpayers with an estimated $175 million bill, the projected cost of road changes in and around Jackson Park deemed necessary for the Obama Presidential Center.

    Last week Rev. B. Herbert Martin Sr. wrote an impassioned letter to the Chicago Tribune emphasizing that there is no social justice sticking taxpayers with the cost for a center purported to be 100 percent privately funded when “our streets run red with blood (and) … schools have been closed in our most vulnerable communities.”

    Ald. David Moore is to be applauded for his “no” vote. His ward is only one of many areas of the city referred to by Martin, where schools need supplies and repairs, and streets need potholes and sewers fixed, among other important needs in our cash-strapped city. Other aldermen need to consider the tax burden of these unnecessary road changes in and around Jackson Park.

    — Karen Rechtschaffen, Chicago

    LOL.

    #191723

    finance85
    Moderator

    The Reverend Martin is correct. The center should be privately funded, and no taxpayer money should be spent given the fiscal problems of Chicago.

    #191771

    wordjazz
    Blocked

    Monuments, parks, and even Presidential Libraries are often partially if not wholly funded by governments. I’m not sure on what basis 85 says this should not occur, but that’s up to the citizens of Chicago and to some extent voters in federal elections.

    #191793

    NoleSoup4U
    Participant

    What kind of douche-bag narcissist would pin a $175 million price tag on a bunch of poor people, just to build his golden idol?

    #191809

    finance85
    Moderator

    jazz, you are right. Governments sometimes fund stuff like the Obama center. That doesn’t make it right. Yes, it’s up to the citizens of Chicago. Apparently some who are true advocates for the poor think the money would be better spent on the poor. I’m really kind of surprised you are advocating against the poor on this one. I guess I shouldn’t be surprised though. You are really a big government guy more than a help the poor guy.

    #191811

    wordjazz
    Blocked

    Neither you or I know what “the poor people” of south Chicago want, but I assure you they love Obama and may – or may not – fully support the Library. It’s up to them and the rest of the city and I am advocating no particular position. Of course it’s possible that changes will still be made as to the traffic issues and even funding. None of you would GAF if it wasn’t about Obama.

    #191812

    NoleSoup4U
    Participant

    Ahh, so we don’t know what they want, but you know what they want?

    #191814

    wordjazz
    Blocked

    I didn’t say that.

    #191817

    NoleSoup4U
    Participant

    Then what was your point? Because that had nothing to do with our point that Obama should know better, but he’s a narcissist first and foremost.

    #191820

    wordjazz
    Blocked

    Anyone who defends Trump has lost all license to ever use the word narcissist again.

    You have been so notified.

    #191821

    NoleSoup4U
    Participant

    I don’t think anyone is arguing that Trump isn’t a narcissist. He’s pretty open about it, unlike some people who try to act like they care about the little people, but are just straight up narcissists.

    #191829

    finance85
    Moderator

    I’m going by what people from Chicago said to the reporter. Some of them seem to be leaders in their community. It’s not me saying what the people need, it’s people who are there. They would know more than you, wouldn’t they jazz? Why do you think You know better?

    #191832

    wordjazz
    Blocked

    No doubt anyone who writes a letter to the editor represents the majority view.

    #191844

    NoleSoup4U
    Participant

    Ironic post is ironic.

    #191851

    finance85
    Moderator

    Jazz, I’d say the Reverend Martin is representative of the poor people of South Chicago. In fact he might be considered one of the foremost experts.

    http://www.progressive-cc.org/about-1/

    Pastor Martin is known far and wide in Chicago and beyond as an exceptional community leader, working tirelessly to heal the social, psychological and spiritual wounds that abound. To his flock at Progressive, and in the community at large, he is a larger-than-life personality, respected and beloved because he respects and loves you.

    Here is a timeline glimpse of Rev. Martin’s impact outside the walls of Progressive

    1979 – Appointed to a 2-year term as Executive Director of the Chicago chapter of Black United Methodist Church Renewal.

    1980-1982 – Served as Executive Director of the Chicago Southside Branch of the NAACP, the nation’s largest, of which he again served as President from 1985-1987. (Chicago Tribune, January 11, 1985)

    1983-87 – Progressive was the home church of Mayor Harold Washington (Chicago Tribune, October 12, 1985), and Pastor Martin was the mayor’s spiritual mentor, either dining with or on the telephone with the mayor every day he was in office. While seeking election in 1983, Mayor Washington received a blessing from Rev. Martin at Progressive’s altar railing. (picture) At his funeral, Rev. Martin delivered an impassioned and eloquent eulogy (see excerpts at end of page). (http://www.nbcuniversalarchives.com/nbcuni/clip/5112537722_010.do) After his death, the Chicago press turned to Pastor Martin when they needed to find out “what Harold would have thought”.

    1986-87 – Served on the Board of Directors, Chicago Housing Authority

    1987-88 – Served as Chairman of the Chicago Housing Authority where he inherited facilities which housed tens of thousands of Chicago residents in increasingly-poor conditions.  Because the facilities were already destined for demolition, no money was being spent on upkeep and repairs, and people were living in squalid conditions. The city pointed to the federal government; the federal government pointed to the city. Rev. Martin at one point chained himself to the offices of the federal Dept. of Housing and Urban Development in order to bring attention to the immediate needs of those under his care. (http://articles.chicagotribune.com/1988-04-17/news/8803090921_1_resign-board-rev-b-herbert-martin)

    1988-89 – Appointed by Mayor Eugene Sawyer as Chairman of the Chicago Commission on Human Relations

    1990s – Rev. Martin worked with Dominic DiFrisco of the Old Neighborhood Italian American Club of Bridgeport to strive for healing across the racial divide. Reaching across the Dan Ryan Expressway into the Bridgeport neighborhood, he worked house by house and block by block to bridge the gap, both racial and physical. (Chicago Tribune, Sept. 29, 2000)

    1997-98 – Rev. Martin spearheaded an effort to emphasize healing, reconciliation and the need for forgiveness in light of the beating by white youths of Lenard Clark in the Armour Square neighborhood west of the Dan Ryan. A prayer vigil was held at Progressive, attended by 1500; the parents of Frank Caruso, convicted in the beating, attended. Martin’s plea for Caruso triggered “the biggest division in the black community since Harold Washington’s death, when Eugene Sawyer and Timothy Evans ran for mayor.” (Chicago Reporter, April 1999.

    http://www.chicagoreporter.com/1999I04-9910499clark.htm

    1998 – In light of increased gang violence and a drug war at the Robert Taylor Homes, Rev. Martin led “Operation Safe Passage”, using men as human shields to escort children to nearby elementary schools as attendance began to plummet. The program attracted attention nationwide by bringing in men from all areas of Chicago and the surrounding suburbs, and by shattering myths about African-American men. The shooting stopped and the gangs called a ceasefire in the face of the show of force. “We drew a line and said enough is enough.” – Rev. Martin (Christian Science Monitor, Wednesday, January 28, 1998, National Edition)

    2000 – Rev. Martin joins Cardinal Francis George in a march organized by the Chicago Project for Violence Prevention to curb gun violence by establishing “cease-fire” zones in the city. (Chicago Tribune, Sept. 2, 2000)

    2006 – Co-chaired the African-American/Jewish Seder, sponsored by the Anti-Defamation League, Urban League and Leaders United.

    2007 – For years, Rev. Martin has been a leader in promoting inter-faith cooperation. One example; his participation in the Interfaith Thanksgiving Observance hosted each year by the National Conference for Community and Justice of Chicago and Greater Illinois. (Chicago Tribune, Nov. 15, 2007).

     

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